OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

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Although humans have driven lions, tigers, wolves, bears and other large carnivores from much of their home territories across the planet, scientists have identified more than 280 areas where these animals could potentially be reintroduced to restore ecosystems on practically every continent....(Full Story)

Old, complex tropical forests support a wider diversity of birds than second-growth forests and have irreplaceable value for conservation, according to an Oregon State University-led exhaustive analysis of bird diversity in the mountains of southern Costa Rica.

During their surveys,...(Full Story)

Last year the Oregon Heritage Tree Committee honored Paul Ries with it highest distinction, the Maynard C. Drawson Memorial Award. In honoring Ries, the committee noted his dedication to the heritage...(Full Story)

Jaclyn is studying the constraints that people face when visiting urban parks in Portland to find out how that affects their feelings about parks and recreation.(Full Story)

Old forests that contain large trees and a diversity of tree sizes and species may offer refuge to some types of birds facing threats in a warming climate, scientists have found.

In a paper published in December 2017 in Diversity and Distributions, a professional journal, researchers in...(Full Story)

Human activities are reshaping forest animal communities around the world. Forest-dwelling animals don’t have to live right by a road, pasture or human settlement to be affected by what scientists call forest edges. Indeed, animals up to a kilometer (0.6 miles) from an edge show a measurable...(Full Story)

A new global analysis of forest habitat loss and wildlife extinction risk published today in the journal Nature shows that species most at risk live in areas just beginning to see the impacts of human activities such as hunting, mining, logging and ranching.

The researchers argue that...(Full Story)

Comparing temperature regimes under the canopy in old-growth and plantation forests in the Oregon Cascades, researchers found that the characteristics of old growth reduce maximum spring and summer air temperatures as much as 2.5 degrees Celsius (4.5 degrees Fahrenheit), compared to those...(Full Story)