College of Forestry News

Blacktail Deer Creek

The findings, published today in Ecohydrology, are important because they highlight the role big predators play in the health of aquatic and riparian ecosystems.

seedling

In a paper published November 1 in Science, Michael Paul Nelson and collaborators propose a coordinating body to act as a neutral third party in gene-editing decision-making.

Wild Bee

An international collaboration, led by Jim Rivers of Oregon State University, has established a roadmap for future research aimed at better understanding the role that managed conifer forests in temperate zones play for the conservation of pollinators such as bees, wasps, flies, beetles and butte

Haiti

Most reports of forest cover and deforestation in tropical nations, said study co-author Warren Cohen of the OSU College of Forestry, fail to make a distinction between primary forest – essentially, untouched original forest – and disturbed forest: that which has been selectively logged, or has r

Andrews Forest

Scientists from the College of Forestry are finding that old growth forests are a refuge for all kinds of birds...and in the face of climate change, forests like this could be more important than we ever thought.

Wetland

Forest biotechnologist Steve Strauss was interviewed with wetland ecologist Karin Kettenring on the Utah Public Radio program UnDisciplined.

Fire refugia

“Those trees are lifeboats,” said Meg Krawchuk, a fire ecologist at Oregon State University. Writing recently in the journal BioScience, Dr.

Hermit Warbler

Hankyu Kim and his colleagues are developing a new experiment in the Oregon Cascades to track the movements of hermit warblers through the forest. Learning how they move could help explain how bird species are dealing with rising temperatures and climate change.

Firefighters

The economic consequences of fire on small communities have been borne out in several studies. Turns out, it’s complicated.

Bee traps

A recent study led by wildlife biologist Jim Rivers, a professor in Oregon State University’s College of Forestry, indicated the removal of slash and other debris and compacting soil in recently harvested forestlands can create prime habitat for bees.