OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

FES News

Home from the Sea

The project is managed through the Institute for Working Forest Landscapes at Oregon State and is a joint effort between researchers at the College of Forestry and the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife in the College of Agricultural Sciences. It aims to answer questions about how forests can be managed for both murrelets and timber. “Murrelets prefer mature, late-successional forests, but they may not be restricted to old growth,” said James Rivers, professor of animal ecology in the college and the lead scientist on the project.

Northwest forests are becoming denser and more vulnerable to fire

Those are among the results of a comprehensive analysis of forest structure and biodiversity based on satellite imagery and on-the-ground field work in the eastern Cascades of Washington, Oregon and Northern California from 1985 to 2010. Matthew Reilly, a former Ph.D. student in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University led the study, which was published in the journal Ecological Applications.

Thousands of scientists issue bleak ‘second notice’ to humanity

“Humanity has failed to make sufficient progress in generally solving these foreseen environmental challenges, and alarmingly, most of them are getting far worse,” they write. This letter, spearheaded by Oregon State University ecologist William Ripple, serves as a “second notice,” the authors say: “Soon it will be too late to shift course away from our failing trajectory.”

'Time is running out'

Lead author William J. Ripple, a distinguished professor of ecology at Oregon State University, said he was astounded by the level of support he and his seven co-authors received for their manuscript.

Troy Hall receives the Benton H. Box Award

Congratulations to FES Department Head Troy Hall! She received the Benton H. Box Award, which recognizes a leader who works to preserve the natural environment and an educator who inspires in students the quest for knowledge and encourages curriculum innovation.

Human activities are reshaping forest animal communities around the world

Human activities are reshaping forest animal communities around the world. Forest-dwelling animals don’t have to live right by a road, pasture or human settlement to be affected by what scientists call forest edges. Indeed, animals up to a kilometer (0.6 miles) from an edge show a measurable impact from their proximity to areas where trees have been removed to make way for other land uses.

Working with — Not Against — The Federal Government

A researcher insight by FES faculty Emily Jane Davis. She says "stories of direct action and contention make headlines, but numerous less visible efforts that seek collaboration around federal lands management are also underway."

In the Game of Extinction, It’s Good to Be Average

The research, published recently in the journal PNAS, is the latest, biggest news from the world of extinction science. The scientists, including William Ripple of the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, found that in any given group of animals—from bony fishes and birds to mammals and reptiles—species at the size extremes tend to be in the most trouble.

OSU forestry alum Henry Gholz dies in climbing accident

“Henry was a proven leader who was dedicated to our profession and was an outstanding member of the community,” said Troy Hall, department head of Forest Ecosystems & Society in the College of Forestry.

Learn about Central Oregon’s top-five evergreen trees

To better acquaint readers with some of Central Oregon’s diverse evergreens, The Bulletin spoke with David Shaw, a forest health specialist and an associate professor in Oregon State University’s Department of Forestry.