OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

FES News

The huge flaw in how Congress is approaching burning wood for energy

“It takes decades to centuries for carbon to accumulate in what I call the forest carbon bank,” said Beverly Law, a professor of global change biology and terrestrial systems science at Oregon State University. On the other hand, burning trees for energy releases all their carbon into the atmosphere immediately. This means that biomass energy has an immediate effect on the climate, one that would take years of tree-growing to reverse.

Steve Strauss featured on the Talking Biotech podcast

Talking Biotech: Oregon’s Steve Strauss on benefits, challenges to genetically engineered trees, forests biology. Dr. Steve Strauss is a Distinguished Professor of Forestry in the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society in the College of Forestry.

Some Phil’s Trail singletrack now wide open

Bend’s Nicole Strong, an assistant professor at Oregon State University’s Forestry and Natural Resources Extension, is also an avid mountain biker. She notes that the tree removal and thinning project will actually accelerate a more sustainable forest by growing healthy old trees, improving wildlife habitat and reducing the risk of high-severity wildfire.

Without This Place: A Glimpse of the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest

The HJ Andrews Forest LTER Program is pleased to announce a new promotional video created by film maker Jeremy Monroe titled "Without This Place". It highlights the importance of long-term research and the research findings of the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and Long-Term Ecological Research site. The HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and LTER is a partnership between Oregon State University, National Science Foundation, Willamette National Forest, Pacific Northwest Research Station, and the US Forest Service.

Studies confirm effect of wolves, elk on tree recovery in Yellowstone National Park

Robert Beschta and William Ripple, two professors in the Oregon State University College of Forestry, analyzed the results of 24 studies of streamside vegetation published since 2001 and reviewed long-term trends in temperature, precipitation, snowpack and stream discharge. Their conclusions have just been released in the journal Biological Conservation.

Old-growth forests may provide buffer against rising temperatures

“Though it is well-known that closed-canopy forests tend to be cooler than open areas, little is known about more subtle temperature differences between mature forest types,” said Sarah Frey, postdoctoral scholar in the OSU College of Forestry and lead author on the study. “We found that the subtle but important gradient in structure from forest plantations to old growth can have a marked effect on temperatures in these forests.”

Two Wolves Remain on Isle Royale

Research by Michael Nelson of Oregon State University shows overwhelming support for having wolves on Isle Royale, even if that involves intervention.

OSU schedules Earth Week presentations on climate change

As part of Earth Week at OSU, Michael Nelson will lead a discussion on Thursday, April 21, at noon, at the Snell Hall International Forum titled “It’s Not Only Stupid, It’s Also Wrong to Wreck the World.” Michael Nelson is professor of environmental ethics and philosophy in the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society.

Ph.D. student teaming up with undergraduates to develop UAV for wetland monitoring

Kate Fickas, a PhD student in Forest Ecosystems and Society and a member of the Laboratory for Applications of Remote Sensing in Ecology (LARSE), has been working with a team of senior engineering undergraduates from the OSU School of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering’s capstone design program to build an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), ‘The Swamp Skimmer’, for wetland monitoring.

Study shows forest thinning changes movement patterns, habitat use by martens

“There are two main reasons that martens avoid open forests,” said Katie Moriarty, a post-doctoral research biologist with the U.S. Forest Service, who conducted the research as a doctoral student at Oregon State University. “Martens eat a lot of food – up to a quarter of their body weight a day. It would be like you eating 100 hamburgers. They need downed logs and dense sapling cover to hunt successfully."