OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

FES News

Marbled Murrelet study along the Oregon coast

The study, led by Oregon State University assistant professor and senior researcher Jim Rivers, is the first to tag marbled murrelets on the open ocean.

Large carnivores have lost more than 90 per cent of their range

Chris Wolf and William Ripple at Oregon State University looked at historical accounts of large carnivores and maps of their preferred habitat around AD 1500, and found that they are now present in just a third of the land area they occupied back then. Of the 25 species analysed, all weighing more than 15 kilograms, 15 had lost more than half their range.

BioBlitz at Avery Park

Luciana Leite, a doctoral student in the College of Forestry and the event’s organizer, said the event had sponsorship from Forest Biodiversity Research Network at OSU and the Student Sustainability Coalition, but the organizers were mostly a group of friends who wanted to promote citizen science.

Wolves need space to roam to control expanding coyote populations

"It will be interesting to see the influence of large predators on smaller predators in other parts of the world, especially the role of the big cats such as jaguars, leopards, lions and tigers," said co-author William Ripple of Oregon State University.

When wolves return to the wild, everything changes

In Yellowstone, the wolves quickly reclaimed their spot as top predator. Ecologist William Ripple of Oregon State University has been studying the wolves since their return.

Historic Camperdown elms saved on state Capitol grounds

Paul Ries, an urban forestry expert who splits time between the Oregon Department of Forestry and Oregon State University, said Camperdown elms are uncommon but not rare. He guessed there may be a few hundred or so in the state, although there is no documentation for an accurate count.

Affluent countries give less to wildlife conservation than rest of the world

Professor William Ripple, Co-author and Oregon State University Professor concluded: 'The Megafauna Conservation Index is an important first step to transparency – some of the poorest countries in the world are making the biggest investments in a global asset and should be congratulated, whereas some of the richest nations just aren’t doing enough.'

New era of western wildfire demands new ways to protect people, ecosystems

“We know we need to learn to live with fire. And when we add climate change to the equation, all signs point to urgent shifts in policies and philosophies of fire in our natural and built landscapes,” said Meg Krawchuk, co-author on the report and an assistant professor in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University.

As more of the Pacific Northwest burns, severe fires change forest ecology

“Large fires can have significant social and economic costs, but they are also playing an important role in the ecology of our forests,” said Matthew Reilly, lead author and a post-doctoral researcher in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University.

Are some wolves being ‘redomesticated’ into dogs?

Bill Ripple is co-author on a new publication out in BioScience, titled "A New Dog". To find out how gray wolves might be affected by eating more people food, Thomas Newsome, an evolutionary biologist at the Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia, and his colleagues examined studies of what’s happened to other large carnivores that live close to people.