OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

FES News

When it comes to the threat of extinction, size matters

"Knowing how animal body size correlates with the likelihood of a species being threatened provides us with a tool to assess extinction risk for the many species we know very little about," said William Ripple, a distinguished professor of ecology at Oregon State University and lead author of the study.

This Season, Western Wildfires Are Close By and Running Free

“There’s just a lot of stuff to burn,” said Janean Creighton, an associate professor of forest ecosystems and society at Oregon State University. The devastation at places like the Columbia River Gorge here in Oregon, which is a treasured hiking spot for Pacific Northwest residents, has also created a deeper emotional impact, Professor Creighton said, especially coming as the nation has been slammed with hurricane disasters in Texas and Florida.

Oregon wildfire fallout a sign of seasons to come

Bottom line, said Meg Krawchuk, an assistant professor of forestry at Oregon State who studies fire, "we're going to see more summers like this, because of the strong march of temperature." She also points to Oregon's growing population, the likelihood that growth will continue, and the growing population in the "wildland urban interface."

Tree farmers take a different path

Dave Hibbs and Sarah Karr, the Benton County tree farmers of the year, walk through their 87-acre property in southern Polk county. Hibbs is a retired College of Forestry professor, and says about their management style: “We’re hoping to see the benefits of taking some of my academic ideas and trying to make it work.”

Seabird research creates opportunities for ecosystem understanding

The Institute for Working Forest Landscapes in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University has funded a little more than one million dollars annually for a new study aimed at conserving marbled murrelet populations in Oregon, said James Rivers, a professor of animal ecology in the College of Forestry and lead researcher on the project.

How one town learned to live with venomous rattlesnakes

Predators like the timber rattlesnake are often the most hated and persecuted wildlife, says William Ripple, a distinguished ecology professor at Oregon State University. This is alarming to scientists, given new research that suggests predators are not only vital to healthy natural environments, but to humanity itself.

Streamflow deficits persist in young Douglas-fir forests

For a master’s degree in geography, Timothy D. Perry analyzed data at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest east of Eugene and in the Coyote Creek watershed in the South Umpqua Experimental Forest. In a report published in the journal Ecohydrology, he and Julia Jones, OSU professor of geography in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, noted that reduced flows in mountain watersheds could affect larger rivers.

Wild bees thrive after severe forest fires

“In low severity spots, if you weren’t looking for the markers of fire, you wouldn’t know that it had burned,” said Sara M. Galbraith, a post-doctoral researcher in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University. “The canopy is completely closed, and the trees are usually older. There isn’t a lot of evidence of fire except for some blackened areas on some of the tree trunks."

With support from the state, forest industry, and conservation groups, OSU researchers gather data on threatened seabird

The research project aims to answer questions about how forests can be managed for both murrelets and timber. “Murrelets prefer mature, late-successional forests, but they may not be restricted to old growth,” said James Rivers, professor of animal ecology in the college and the lead scientist on the project.

Marbled Murrelet study along the Oregon coast

The study, led by Oregon State University assistant professor and senior researcher Jim Rivers, is the first to tag marbled murrelets on the open ocean.