OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

FES News

When wolves return to the wild, everything changes

In Yellowstone, the wolves quickly reclaimed their spot as top predator. Ecologist William Ripple of Oregon State University has been studying the wolves since their return.

Historic Camperdown elms saved on state Capitol grounds

Paul Ries, an urban forestry expert who splits time between the Oregon Department of Forestry and Oregon State University, said Camperdown elms are uncommon but not rare. He guessed there may be a few hundred or so in the state, although there is no documentation for an accurate count.

Affluent countries give less to wildlife conservation than rest of the world

Professor William Ripple, Co-author and Oregon State University Professor concluded: 'The Megafauna Conservation Index is an important first step to transparency – some of the poorest countries in the world are making the biggest investments in a global asset and should be congratulated, whereas some of the richest nations just aren’t doing enough.'

New era of western wildfire demands new ways to protect people, ecosystems

“We know we need to learn to live with fire. And when we add climate change to the equation, all signs point to urgent shifts in policies and philosophies of fire in our natural and built landscapes,” said Meg Krawchuk, co-author on the report and an assistant professor in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University.

As more of the Pacific Northwest burns, severe fires change forest ecology

“Large fires can have significant social and economic costs, but they are also playing an important role in the ecology of our forests,” said Matthew Reilly, lead author and a post-doctoral researcher in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University.

Are some wolves being ‘redomesticated’ into dogs?

Bill Ripple is co-author on a new publication out in BioScience, titled "A New Dog". To find out how gray wolves might be affected by eating more people food, Thomas Newsome, an evolutionary biologist at the Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia, and his colleagues examined studies of what’s happened to other large carnivores that live close to people.

What Do We Love Too Much to Lose?

McCabe and Moore will give an encore presentation of “A Call to Life” at the LaSells Stewart Center’s Austin Auditorium at 7 p.m., April 7. The event will include a panel of researchers and science teachers who will discuss extinction and the astounding diversity of species. Bill Ripple, Michael Paul Nelson, and Matthew Betts will be among the researchers involved.

Reversal of Oregon's GMO local pre-emption debated

Steve Strauss, an Oregon State University professor who studies biotechnology, said lawmakers should ask themselves whether they want Oregon agriculture to be known for innovation or for exclusion.

Southern Oregon forest restoration may take precedence over spotted owl habitat

Inspiration for the study came from K. Norman Johnson, professor in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University. He discovered detailed tree inventories done between 1914 and 1924 for the part of the Fremont-Winema National Forest that was in the Klamath Reservation.

Redwood Audubon Presents Hummingbird Highways

The Redwood Region Audubon Society is hosting their annual benefit dinner on March 4th. Speaker Matt Betts will be discussing his work studying hummingbirds and their relationship with forest fragmentation and plant pollination.