FES News

Killing to Conserve

“What we have here is the idea of killing in the name of conservation,” says Michael Nelson, professor of environmental ethics and philosophy at Oregon State University’s College of Forestry, who has written extensively on the subject, and on the ethics of hunting wolves in particular. “If animals don’t matter very much, then you can say: ‘We’ll kill a few of them and see if it does what we think it will do.’”

Wolf recovery in Oregon can become a success story

A piece by Robert L. Beschta, professor emeritus with Forest Ecosystems and Society and Michael Paul Nelson, professor of environmental philosophy and ethics with Forest Ecosystems and Society, both at Oregon State University.

New Book: "Forest Under Story: Creative Inquiry in an Old-Growth Forest"

Two kinds of long-term research are taking place at the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest, a renowned research facility in the temperate rain forest of the Oregon Cascades. Here, scientists investigate the ecosystem's trees, wildlife, water, and nutrients with an eye toward understanding change over varying timescales up to two hundred years or more. And writers from both literary and scientific backgrounds spend time in the forest investigating the ecological and human complexities of this remarkable and deeply studied place.

Dread is vanishing from the animal world. Here’s why that’s a bad thing.

“For the first time in 70 years, the park has a complete suite of predators and prey,” Oregon State University forest ecologist William Ripple, a co-author on the study, told The Washington Post in 2004. “This is a grand experiment.”

Is There Really a War on Science?

Panelist Steve Strauss, Oregon State University professor of forestry, took a sharper tone as he lay out of a brief history of a growing campaign against genetically modified crops.

Taking Stock of Recovery

Graduate student Jonathan Batchelor worked with William Ripple, a Distinguished Professor of Forestry, to compare 64 pairs of photos taken over 23 years. Only 6 percent of what was bare soil in the early 1990s remained in that condition when new photos were taken in 2013 and 2014. Fourfold increases in willows and rushes were among the results they reported last year in the journal Environmental Management.

Jim Rivers honored as new American Ornithologists' Union Fellow

At the 133rd stated meeting of the American Ornithologists' Union (AOU) in Norman, Oklahoma, this July, the society welcomed fifteen new Fellows, including FES assistant professor Jim Rivers, and two Honorary Fellows, who were selected by their peers for their outstanding contributions to the field of ornithology and their service to the AOU.

Forest corridors prove critical to biodiversity and pollination success in the tropics

“Wooded corridors remain abundant in many tropical landscapes,” said Matthew Betts, co-author and assistant professor at Oregon State. “But as agricultural land use is expanding rapidly, quick action will be required to avert the disappearance of corridor elements between fragments. Otherwise, there may substantial losses of connectivity between forest remnants, leading to accelerated biodiversity loss.”

Selecting, Planting, and Caring for a New Tree

This book is published as both an interactive app designed for tablet devices and as a downloadable pdf. Both versions cover basic information on choosing a planting site, selecting the right species for the site, proper planting techniques, and first-year care. Authored by Paul Ries and Stephen Fitzgerald.

Grad student Randi Shaw receives the 2016 Frances Dancy Hooks Award

Congratulations to Randi Shaw, who received the 2016 Frances Dancy Hooks Award at the Martin Luther King Jr Peace Breakfast on January 18. This award was initiated in 1994, when Frances Dancy Hooks and Dr. Benjamin Hooks were here as keynote speakers for the King celebration.