OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

FES News

How one town learned to live with venomous rattlesnakes

Predators like the timber rattlesnake are often the most hated and persecuted wildlife, says William Ripple, a distinguished ecology professor at Oregon State University. This is alarming to scientists, given new research that suggests predators are not only vital to healthy natural environments, but to humanity itself.

Streamflow deficits persist in young Douglas-fir forests

For a master’s degree in geography, Timothy D. Perry analyzed data at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest east of Eugene and in the Coyote Creek watershed in the South Umpqua Experimental Forest. In a report published in the journal Ecohydrology, he and Julia Jones, OSU professor of geography in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, noted that reduced flows in mountain watersheds could affect larger rivers.

Wild bees thrive after severe forest fires

“In low severity spots, if you weren’t looking for the markers of fire, you wouldn’t know that it had burned,” said Sara M. Galbraith, a post-doctoral researcher in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University. “The canopy is completely closed, and the trees are usually older. There isn’t a lot of evidence of fire except for some blackened areas on some of the tree trunks."

With support from the state, forest industry, and conservation groups, OSU researchers gather data on threatened seabird

The research project aims to answer questions about how forests can be managed for both murrelets and timber. “Murrelets prefer mature, late-successional forests, but they may not be restricted to old growth,” said James Rivers, professor of animal ecology in the college and the lead scientist on the project.

Marbled Murrelet study along the Oregon coast

The study, led by Oregon State University assistant professor and senior researcher Jim Rivers, is the first to tag marbled murrelets on the open ocean.

Large carnivores have lost more than 90 per cent of their range

Chris Wolf and William Ripple at Oregon State University looked at historical accounts of large carnivores and maps of their preferred habitat around AD 1500, and found that they are now present in just a third of the land area they occupied back then. Of the 25 species analysed, all weighing more than 15 kilograms, 15 had lost more than half their range.

BioBlitz at Avery Park

Luciana Leite, a doctoral student in the College of Forestry and the event’s organizer, said the event had sponsorship from Forest Biodiversity Research Network at OSU and the Student Sustainability Coalition, but the organizers were mostly a group of friends who wanted to promote citizen science.

Wolves need space to roam to control expanding coyote populations

"It will be interesting to see the influence of large predators on smaller predators in other parts of the world, especially the role of the big cats such as jaguars, leopards, lions and tigers," said co-author William Ripple of Oregon State University.

When wolves return to the wild, everything changes

In Yellowstone, the wolves quickly reclaimed their spot as top predator. Ecologist William Ripple of Oregon State University has been studying the wolves since their return.

Historic Camperdown elms saved on state Capitol grounds

Paul Ries, an urban forestry expert who splits time between the Oregon Department of Forestry and Oregon State University, said Camperdown elms are uncommon but not rare. He guessed there may be a few hundred or so in the state, although there is no documentation for an accurate count.