OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

FES News

OSU schedules Earth Week presentations on climate change

As part of Earth Week at OSU, Michael Nelson will lead a discussion on Thursday, April 21, at noon, at the Snell Hall International Forum titled “It’s Not Only Stupid, It’s Also Wrong to Wreck the World.” Michael Nelson is professor of environmental ethics and philosophy in the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society.

Ph.D. student teaming up with undergraduates to develop UAV for wetland monitoring

Kate Fickas, a PhD student in Forest Ecosystems and Society and a member of the Laboratory for Applications of Remote Sensing in Ecology (LARSE), has been working with a team of senior engineering undergraduates from the OSU School of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering’s capstone design program to build an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), ‘The Swamp Skimmer’, for wetland monitoring.

Study shows forest thinning changes movement patterns, habitat use by martens

“There are two main reasons that martens avoid open forests,” said Katie Moriarty, a post-doctoral research biologist with the U.S. Forest Service, who conducted the research as a doctoral student at Oregon State University. “Martens eat a lot of food – up to a quarter of their body weight a day. It would be like you eating 100 hamburgers. They need downed logs and dense sapling cover to hunt successfully."

Ancient bones point to shifting grassland species as climate changes

In a report in Science Advances, an analysis was done of mammoth and bison hair, teeth and bones, along with other data. It concludes that a changing climate — particularly increasing rainfall and not just atmospheric carbon dioxide — explains the expansion of grassland plants during the latter part of the Neogene, a geologic era that includes the present. The research was led by Jennifer Cotton as a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Utah and in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University. Co-authors include Christopher J.

Killing to Conserve

“What we have here is the idea of killing in the name of conservation,” says Michael Nelson, professor of environmental ethics and philosophy at Oregon State University’s College of Forestry, who has written extensively on the subject, and on the ethics of hunting wolves in particular. “If animals don’t matter very much, then you can say: ‘We’ll kill a few of them and see if it does what we think it will do.’”

Wolf recovery in Oregon can become a success story

A piece by Robert L. Beschta, professor emeritus with Forest Ecosystems and Society and Michael Paul Nelson, professor of environmental philosophy and ethics with Forest Ecosystems and Society, both at Oregon State University.

New Book: "Forest Under Story: Creative Inquiry in an Old-Growth Forest"

Two kinds of long-term research are taking place at the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest, a renowned research facility in the temperate rain forest of the Oregon Cascades. Here, scientists investigate the ecosystem's trees, wildlife, water, and nutrients with an eye toward understanding change over varying timescales up to two hundred years or more. And writers from both literary and scientific backgrounds spend time in the forest investigating the ecological and human complexities of this remarkable and deeply studied place.

Dread is vanishing from the animal world. Here’s why that’s a bad thing.

“For the first time in 70 years, the park has a complete suite of predators and prey,” Oregon State University forest ecologist William Ripple, a co-author on the study, told The Washington Post in 2004. “This is a grand experiment.”

Is There Really a War on Science?

Panelist Steve Strauss, Oregon State University professor of forestry, took a sharper tone as he lay out of a brief history of a growing campaign against genetically modified crops.

Taking Stock of Recovery

Graduate student Jonathan Batchelor worked with William Ripple, a Distinguished Professor of Forestry, to compare 64 pairs of photos taken over 23 years. Only 6 percent of what was bare soil in the early 1990s remained in that condition when new photos were taken in 2013 and 2014. Fourfold increases in willows and rushes were among the results they reported last year in the journal Environmental Management.