Departmental News

Why we need predators

Large carnivores, the really scary animals that are easy to hate, are on the decline worldwide. That has led to numerous changes to ecosystems, William Ripple of Oregon State University in Corvallis and colleagues noted in Science last year. When carnivores are removed from an ecosystem (or returned to one), there are cascades of changes to the local food web.

Opportunity for MS Degree focusing on forest science and information management

The HJ Andrews Experimental Forest and Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Site has funding for a student to pursue a Master’s Degree focusing on Information Management in the Forest Ecosystems and Society Department, starting by Fall 2016.

What Do Wild Animals Do in a Wildfire?

Heat can kill too—even organisms buried deep in the ground, such as fungi. Jane Smith, a mycologist with the U.S. Forest Service in Corvallis, Oregon, has measured temperatures as high as 1,292 degrees Fahrenheit (700 degrees Celsius) beneath logs burning in a wildfire, and 212 degrees Fahrenheit (100 degrees Celsius) a full two inches (five centimeters) below the surface.

Genetically modified trees are being 'strangled' by red tape

"With global climate change and the spreading of pests, it's rather urgent we have all the tools we can bring to bear," lead author Dr Steven Strauss from the Oregon State University told BBC News.

Grizzly bears are helped by wolves

Wild fruit is an important part of grizzly bear diets, especially when they are trying to gain weight before winter hibernation stated study co-author William Ripple, a forest ecosystems researcher at Oregon State University.

South Korean students visit OSU

Extension Specialist Paul Ries showed a group of students from South Korea around the urban forests of Corvallis this week. OSU’s College of Forestry and Agriculture are partnered with INTO OSU to provide a program for Kyungpook National University in South Korea. This first-of-its-kind program brings a cohort of ten Korean college students, majoring in diverse Agriculture and Forestry related fields, to Oregon to experience university life and learning at OSU.

Rising fossil fuel energy costs spell trouble for global food security

“It is mostly a race between the capacity of microbe populations to grow on human foodstuffs and evolve adaptations to changing conditions and the capacity of humans to come up with new technologies for preserving, storing, and transporting food,” wrote lead author Sean T. Hammond, a postdoctoral researcher and interdisciplinary ecologist in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University.

Insect-killed forests pose no additional likelihood of wildfire

“Our analysis suggests that wildfire likelihood does not increase following most insect outbreaks,” said Garrett Meigs, lead author of a paper published this week in the open-access journal Ecosphere. Meigs is a former Ph.D. student in the Oregon State University College of Forestry.

Graduate Certificate in Forests and Climate Change now available online!

Earning a Graduate Certificate in Forests and Climate Change online from Oregon State University will enable you to make informed decisions about managing forests in an era of climate change to help keep our forests and planet healthy. This 19-credit certificate is designed to train working professionals – mid-career, company, industry and agency employees – who want more experience in natural resources management and climate change. The flexible online format allows you to maintain your career focus while taking classes to improve your academic credentials.

Scientists release predatory flies to protect eastern hemlocks from insect attack

A research team led by two entomologists – Darrell Ross in the Oregon State College of Forestry and Kimberly Wallin with the University of Vermont and the USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station – demonstrated that a type of fly in the Pacific Northwest known as a silver fly (species in the genus Leucopis) attacks adelgids on western and eastern hemlocks.