FES News

Bushmeat hunting threatens mammal populations and ecosystems, poses food security threat

An international team led by William Ripple, distinguished professor of ecology at Oregon State University, analyzed data on the IUCN Red List to reach their findings, which were published today in Royal Society Open Science, a professional journal.

Conifer needles will drop. That's OK, says OSU urban forestry expert

Such botanical behavior is natural, said Paul Ries, urban forestry specialist for the Oregon State University Extension Service. Evergreen conifers shed needles just as deciduous trees lose leaves; it just happens over a longer period of time.

Poll: Most Oregonians Oppose Hunting of Wolves, Favor Nonlethal Conflict Prevention

“It’s very encouraging — and far from surprising — that the survey indicates a broad majority of Oregonians believe we can, and should, find ways to coexist with wolves,” said Dr. Michael Paul Nelson, a professor at Oregon State University whose research focuses on ecosystems and society. “And it should be instructive to policymakers that these results demonstrate that people across the state — even in rural areas most affected by wolves — want our public policies on wolves to reflect the facts, not unsubstantiated rhetoric and opinions.”

How OSU’s Dr. Ripple Has Helped Rewrite the Laws on Predators

Dr. Bill Ripple made a discovery in the late 90s that shed some light on the unique roles of predators that has led to collaboration with researchers around the world. Ripple, now a Distinguished Professor and well known researcher, was just doing what comes naturally when he is curious. We call this the Ripple Effect.

Successful control of reproduction could help address concerns about use of engineered trees

Forestry scientists have found a way to arrest the development of flowers in poplar trees, paving the way for control of the unintentional spread of engineered or non-native tree species.

A sign of safer times: Corvallis neighborhood receives wildfire prevention recognition

The area known as Skyline West, which was annexed into the City in 1989, has been designated a “firewise” community — one of six in Benton County — for its fire-prevention efforts in working with Oregon State University, the Corvallis Fire Department, Oregon Department of Forestry and the Parks and Recreation Department’s urban forester to develop wildfire mitigation practice and awareness.

Old Growth May Help Protect Northwest Forest Birds from the Impacts of Climate Change

“I expected to see a difference, but I was surprised by how big it actually was,” says Sarah Frey, a Northwest Climate Science Center graduate fellow at Oregon State University, and lead researcher on the project. “We compared old growth to other closed forest types rather than to clear-cuts, so we didn’t expect the difference to be so dramatic.” Under the supervision of her advisor, Matthew Betts, Frey logs temperature at 183 sites across the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest, a National Science Foundation Long-Term Ecological Research site on the west side of Oregon's Cascade Mountains.

Wolves, big cats are running out of things to eat

In 2014, researchers at Oregon State University found 24 of the planet's 31 largest carnivores -- including bears, cougars, dingoes, lions, lynxes, sea otters and wolves -- are in decline. More recently, William J. Ripple, an ecologist at Oregon State, set out to identify what factors were most predictive of predator decline. There were the usual suspects: hunting, poaching and habitat loss.

Making a Mass Anti-Extinction Movement

The group, led by Oregon State University professor William Ripple, penned a manifesto of sorts to protest the imminent extinction of large carnivores and herbivores the world over.

Burning biomass for energy

“It takes decades to centuries for carbon to accumulate in what I call the forest carbon bank,” said Beverly Law, a professor of global change biology and terrestrial systems science at Oregon State University. On the other hand, burning trees for energy releases all their carbon into the atmosphere immediately. This means that biomass energy has an immediate effect on the climate, one that would take years of tree-growing to reverse.