OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Departmental News

Simple Real-time Dashboards Built with Story Maps

Using the Story Map Tour storytelling template and ArcGIS Online, a simple map-based dashboard was developed to let researchers, administrators, and the general public view real-time data from 125 different sensors including webcams, stream gauges, and weather stations deployed throughout the forest. The dashboard is a really nice way to see all these data streams in their spatial context” said Mark Schulze, HJ Andrews Experimental Forest Director.

Anatomy of a Climate Tool

Melanie Brown, a natural resource management major in the College of Forestry, and OSU researcher Dominique Bachelet surveyed land managers in sagebrush country to create a blueprint for a practical, nimble, accessible computer tool for helping manage fires, protect wildlife, reseed vegetation and control invasives in a shifting landscape.

Rhinos And Other Large Herbivores At Risk Of Extinction

FES professor Bill Ripple was interviewed on NPR's Here & Now about his latest research on large herbivores.

Douglas-fir trees the hardest hit in tree die-back

Landscape and forest trees are experiencing widespread dieback this spring according to Glenn Ahrens, Oregon State University Extension Forester for Marion County. "Browning or dieback is usually caused by weather-related stress, sometimes in combination with pests and diseases," he said.

Kids feel the rush of the outdoors

Brad Withrow-Robinson of OSU Extension Service said many of the events focused on families because organizers wanted to encourage greater mental and physical health.

Collateral damage: Backers say M2-89 would only ban GMO crops, but OSU researchers fear it would hurt them too

In his third-floor laboratory in Richardson Hall, Oregon State University forestry professor Steven Strauss shows off his latest creation: genetically engineered poplar trees that can be propagated in a Petri dish but are incapable of reproducing in the field.

When Have Wolves Made A 'Recovery?' It Depends On Your Definition.

FES professor and ecologist Bill Ripple is famous for his work looking at the ecological effect of the reintroduction of wolves in Yellowstone, finding that the apex predators have a profound impact on the whole landscape, including vegetation. For example, the threat of wolves influence where deer and elk feed, allowing certain plant communities to thrive. “I think it’s important to think about ecological interactions and the functions that predators have, rather than just the total number that may be in a state, or on a landscape or in a region,” Ripple says.

Global decline of large herbivores may lead to an “empty landscape,” scientists say

Study leader Professor William Ripple, of the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, said: ‘I expected that habitat change would be the main factor causing the endangerment of large herbivores. But surprisingly, the results show that the two main factors in herbivore declines are hunting by humans and habitat change. They are twin threats.'

A New OSU College of Forestry Research and Demonstration Forest in Washington County

It is with great excitement that we can announce that the Rubie P. Matteson Demonstration Forest has been established as the newest parcel of the OSU Research Forests. The 180-acre tract, located near the west shore of Hagg Lake near Gaston, will be managed as a working forest, providing income to the College of Forestry, access to the public, and a multitude of Extension, education and demonstration opportunities.

Did a Monstrous Prehistoric Flood Seed Oregon’s Mystery Trees?

Led by forestry professor Steve Strauss, a team of researchers is out to prove that these aspens were transported hundreds of miles to the Willamette Valley via the Missoula Floods, the ice age deluge that raced across Eastern Washington from Montana, emptying more than 15 times the combined flow of every river on earth in just a few days.

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