OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

FES News

Taking Stock of Recovery

Graduate student Jonathan Batchelor worked with William Ripple, a Distinguished Professor of Forestry, to compare 64 pairs of photos taken over 23 years. Only 6 percent of what was bare soil in the early 1990s remained in that condition when new photos were taken in 2013 and 2014. Fourfold increases in willows and rushes were among the results they reported last year in the journal Environmental Management.

Jim Rivers honored as new American Ornithologists' Union Fellow

At the 133rd stated meeting of the American Ornithologists' Union (AOU) in Norman, Oklahoma, this July, the society welcomed fifteen new Fellows, including FES assistant professor Jim Rivers, and two Honorary Fellows, who were selected by their peers for their outstanding contributions to the field of ornithology and their service to the AOU.

Forest corridors prove critical to biodiversity and pollination success in the tropics

“Wooded corridors remain abundant in many tropical landscapes,” said Matthew Betts, co-author and assistant professor at Oregon State. “But as agricultural land use is expanding rapidly, quick action will be required to avert the disappearance of corridor elements between fragments. Otherwise, there may substantial losses of connectivity between forest remnants, leading to accelerated biodiversity loss.”

Selecting, Planting, and Caring for a New Tree

This book is published as both an interactive app designed for tablet devices and as a downloadable pdf. Both versions cover basic information on choosing a planting site, selecting the right species for the site, proper planting techniques, and first-year care. Authored by Paul Ries and Stephen Fitzgerald.

Grad student Randi Shaw receives the 2016 Frances Dancy Hooks Award

Congratulations to Randi Shaw, who received the 2016 Frances Dancy Hooks Award at the Martin Luther King Jr Peace Breakfast on January 18. This award was initiated in 1994, when Frances Dancy Hooks and Dr. Benjamin Hooks were here as keynote speakers for the King celebration.

"Rot: The Afterlife of Trees" at The Arts Center

Forest ecologist Dr. Mark Harmon of Oregon State University wanted his research in the study of tree decomposition to reach a much broader audience than just the scientific community. His solution was using visual, written and performing arts, through a unique collaboration among the Oregon State University Department of Forestry, H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, OSU's Spring Creek Project and The Arts Center.

Harmon and Pabst recognized in the Journal of Vegetation Science

Each year the Chief Editors acknowledge one paper published in JVS with the Editors’ Award. One ruunner up was the paper of Harmon & Pabst (2015), which tested predictions of forest succession using 100-yr long measurements. Mark Harmon and Rob Pabst are faculty members in FES. Congratulations Mark & Rob!

New life follows the death of trees

Mark Harmon, professor and holder of the Richardson Chair in the Oregon State College of Forestry, spoke about the afterlife of trees at the Corvallis Science Pub. “I was interested in decomposition when I was a kid for some reason,” Harmon said. “As I got older, I realized that that was a field that wasn’t well understood.”

Oregon wolves: still endangered?

The commission’s consideration has caught the attention of many across the state, including scientists at Oregon State University. Among them is professor Michael Nelson, who helped draft a letter to the ODFW commission in an effort to have them reconsider their suggestion. Michael Nelson is professor of environmental ethics and philosophy in the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society.

Prehistoric predators kept large animals in check, shaped ecosystems

“Large predators can have a major role in limiting their prey and in determining the structure and function of ecosystems,” said William Ripple, distinguished professor in the Oregon State University College of Forestry. “But scientists have thought that the largest herbivores, such as elephants, were immune from predation. We now know that’s not the case, and based on these data from the Pleistocene (the epoch which lasted from about 2.5 million to 11,700 years ago), we now think that large carnivores did limit the large herbivores at that time.”