OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Departmental News

Scientists release predatory flies to protect eastern hemlocks from insect attack

A research team led by two entomologists – Darrell Ross in the Oregon State College of Forestry and Kimberly Wallin with the University of Vermont and the USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station – demonstrated that a type of fly in the Pacific Northwest known as a silver fly (species in the genus Leucopis) attacks adelgids on western and eastern hemlocks.

The pope plays his trump card: teaching the power of moral actions

FES professor Michael Paul Nelson and Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Oregon State University Kathleen Dean Moore weigh in on Pope Francis' encyclical: As environmental philosophers, here’s what we think: It means you should wash your hands of it. That’s it. No excuses. From now on, those who want out of the obligation to do what’s right on climate will have to give reasons, reasons more powerful than moral principle.

Simple Real-time Dashboards Built with Story Maps

Using the Story Map Tour storytelling template and ArcGIS Online, a simple map-based dashboard was developed to let researchers, administrators, and the general public view real-time data from 125 different sensors including webcams, stream gauges, and weather stations deployed throughout the forest. The dashboard is a really nice way to see all these data streams in their spatial context” said Mark Schulze, HJ Andrews Experimental Forest Director.

Anatomy of a Climate Tool

Melanie Brown, a natural resource management major in the College of Forestry, and OSU researcher Dominique Bachelet surveyed land managers in sagebrush country to create a blueprint for a practical, nimble, accessible computer tool for helping manage fires, protect wildlife, reseed vegetation and control invasives in a shifting landscape.

Rhinos And Other Large Herbivores At Risk Of Extinction

FES professor Bill Ripple was interviewed on NPR's Here & Now about his latest research on large herbivores.

Douglas-fir trees the hardest hit in tree die-back

Landscape and forest trees are experiencing widespread dieback this spring according to Glenn Ahrens, Oregon State University Extension Forester for Marion County. "Browning or dieback is usually caused by weather-related stress, sometimes in combination with pests and diseases," he said.

Kids feel the rush of the outdoors

Brad Withrow-Robinson of OSU Extension Service said many of the events focused on families because organizers wanted to encourage greater mental and physical health.

Collateral damage: Backers say M2-89 would only ban GMO crops, but OSU researchers fear it would hurt them too

In his third-floor laboratory in Richardson Hall, Oregon State University forestry professor Steven Strauss shows off his latest creation: genetically engineered poplar trees that can be propagated in a Petri dish but are incapable of reproducing in the field.

When Have Wolves Made A 'Recovery?' It Depends On Your Definition.

FES professor and ecologist Bill Ripple is famous for his work looking at the ecological effect of the reintroduction of wolves in Yellowstone, finding that the apex predators have a profound impact on the whole landscape, including vegetation. For example, the threat of wolves influence where deer and elk feed, allowing certain plant communities to thrive. “I think it’s important to think about ecological interactions and the functions that predators have, rather than just the total number that may be in a state, or on a landscape or in a region,” Ripple says.

Global decline of large herbivores may lead to an “empty landscape,” scientists say

Study leader Professor William Ripple, of the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, said: ‘I expected that habitat change would be the main factor causing the endangerment of large herbivores. But surprisingly, the results show that the two main factors in herbivore declines are hunting by humans and habitat change. They are twin threats.'

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