OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Departmental News

Rising fossil fuel energy costs spell trouble for global food security

“It is mostly a race between the capacity of microbe populations to grow on human foodstuffs and evolve adaptations to changing conditions and the capacity of humans to come up with new technologies for preserving, storing, and transporting food,” wrote lead author Sean T. Hammond, a postdoctoral researcher and interdisciplinary ecologist in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University.

Insect-killed forests pose no additional likelihood of wildfire

“Our analysis suggests that wildfire likelihood does not increase following most insect outbreaks,” said Garrett Meigs, lead author of a paper published this week in the open-access journal Ecosphere. Meigs is a former Ph.D. student in the Oregon State University College of Forestry.

Graduate Certificate in Forests and Climate Change now available online!

Earning a Graduate Certificate in Forests and Climate Change online from Oregon State University will enable you to make informed decisions about managing forests in an era of climate change to help keep our forests and planet healthy. This 19-credit certificate is designed to train working professionals – mid-career, company, industry and agency employees – who want more experience in natural resources management and climate change. The flexible online format allows you to maintain your career focus while taking classes to improve your academic credentials.

Scientists release predatory flies to protect eastern hemlocks from insect attack

A research team led by two entomologists – Darrell Ross in the Oregon State College of Forestry and Kimberly Wallin with the University of Vermont and the USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station – demonstrated that a type of fly in the Pacific Northwest known as a silver fly (species in the genus Leucopis) attacks adelgids on western and eastern hemlocks.

The pope plays his trump card: teaching the power of moral actions

FES professor Michael Paul Nelson and Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at Oregon State University Kathleen Dean Moore weigh in on Pope Francis' encyclical: As environmental philosophers, here’s what we think: It means you should wash your hands of it. That’s it. No excuses. From now on, those who want out of the obligation to do what’s right on climate will have to give reasons, reasons more powerful than moral principle.

Simple Real-time Dashboards Built with Story Maps

Using the Story Map Tour storytelling template and ArcGIS Online, a simple map-based dashboard was developed to let researchers, administrators, and the general public view real-time data from 125 different sensors including webcams, stream gauges, and weather stations deployed throughout the forest. The dashboard is a really nice way to see all these data streams in their spatial context” said Mark Schulze, HJ Andrews Experimental Forest Director.

Anatomy of a Climate Tool

Melanie Brown, a natural resource management major in the College of Forestry, and OSU researcher Dominique Bachelet surveyed land managers in sagebrush country to create a blueprint for a practical, nimble, accessible computer tool for helping manage fires, protect wildlife, reseed vegetation and control invasives in a shifting landscape.

Rhinos And Other Large Herbivores At Risk Of Extinction

FES professor Bill Ripple was interviewed on NPR's Here & Now about his latest research on large herbivores.

Douglas-fir trees the hardest hit in tree die-back

Landscape and forest trees are experiencing widespread dieback this spring according to Glenn Ahrens, Oregon State University Extension Forester for Marion County. "Browning or dieback is usually caused by weather-related stress, sometimes in combination with pests and diseases," he said.

Kids feel the rush of the outdoors

Brad Withrow-Robinson of OSU Extension Service said many of the events focused on families because organizers wanted to encourage greater mental and physical health.

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