OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

FES News

Kids feel the rush of the outdoors

Brad Withrow-Robinson of OSU Extension Service said many of the events focused on families because organizers wanted to encourage greater mental and physical health.

Collateral damage: Backers say M2-89 would only ban GMO crops, but OSU researchers fear it would hurt them too

In his third-floor laboratory in Richardson Hall, Oregon State University forestry professor Steven Strauss shows off his latest creation: genetically engineered poplar trees that can be propagated in a Petri dish but are incapable of reproducing in the field.

When Have Wolves Made A 'Recovery?' It Depends On Your Definition.

FES professor and ecologist Bill Ripple is famous for his work looking at the ecological effect of the reintroduction of wolves in Yellowstone, finding that the apex predators have a profound impact on the whole landscape, including vegetation. For example, the threat of wolves influence where deer and elk feed, allowing certain plant communities to thrive. “I think it’s important to think about ecological interactions and the functions that predators have, rather than just the total number that may be in a state, or on a landscape or in a region,” Ripple says.

Global decline of large herbivores may lead to an “empty landscape,” scientists say

Study leader Professor William Ripple, of the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, said: ‘I expected that habitat change would be the main factor causing the endangerment of large herbivores. But surprisingly, the results show that the two main factors in herbivore declines are hunting by humans and habitat change. They are twin threats.'

A New OSU College of Forestry Research and Demonstration Forest in Washington County

It is with great excitement that we can announce that the Rubie P. Matteson Demonstration Forest has been established as the newest parcel of the OSU Research Forests. The 180-acre tract, located near the west shore of Hagg Lake near Gaston, will be managed as a working forest, providing income to the College of Forestry, access to the public, and a multitude of Extension, education and demonstration opportunities.

Did a Monstrous Prehistoric Flood Seed Oregon’s Mystery Trees?

Led by forestry professor Steve Strauss, a team of researchers is out to prove that these aspens were transported hundreds of miles to the Willamette Valley via the Missoula Floods, the ice age deluge that raced across Eastern Washington from Montana, emptying more than 15 times the combined flow of every river on earth in just a few days.

Siuslaw rebounding, but questions persist

Joining Furnish on the panel were current Siuslaw supervisor Jerry Ingersoll, environmental activist Chandra LeGue of Oregon Wild and OSU forestry professor Norm Johnson, one of the architects of the Northwest Forest Plan.

Beaver Nation: Kati McCrae

Kati McCrae believes it’s extremely valuable for students to do volunteer work, explore their world and try out potential career fields before earning their degrees. The natural resources major came to Oregon State wanting study and work outside, but contracted Lyme disease in 2012. She hasn't let the chronic fatigue and memory loss the disease caused keep her down.

Steens Aspen

Trent Seager, FES PhD Candidate, was featured in a recent episode of the OPB program Oregon Field Guide. He spoke about Aspen trees and the Steens ecosystem, which he studied for his MSc and PhD at OSU.

Siuslaw National Forest transition from timber to ecology to be focus of April 2 public meeting

On April 2, 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Corvallis-Benton County Public Library, JIm Furnish will participate in a panel discussion on the dramatic shift in forest management. The meeting is open to the public and will include the premier showing of a new 25-minute documentary, Seeing the Forest, by independent journalist and filmmaker Alan Honick of Seattle. Included on the panel is Norm Johnson, distinguished professor of forestry at Oregon State University.