OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

FES News

‘Rewilding’ Missing Carnivores May Help Restore Some Landscapes

“We’re just uncovering these effects of large carnivores at the same time their populations are declining and are at risk,” said William Ripple, an ecologist at Oregon State University. He’s found that if you rewild some carnivores, or return them back to lost ranges, a cascade of ecological bounty may follow.

20,000 scientists give dire warning about the future in 'letter to humanity' – and the world is listening

The lead author of the warning letter and new response paper, ecology Professor William Ripple, from Oregon State University, said: “Our scientists’ warning to humanity has clearly struck a chord with both the global scientific community and the public.”

Corvallis Science Pub will focus on an endangered seabird, the marbled murrelet

At the Corvallis Science Pub on March 12, Jim Rivers, assistant professor in the College of Forestry, will discuss an ongoing Oregon State University research project to learn more about the behavior of this endangered species. Science Pub begins at 6 p.m. in the Old World Deli, 341 2nd St. in Corvallis and is free and open to the public.

The Giving Trees

OSU senior instructor Badege Bishaw collaborates with the Corvallis-Gondar Sister Cities Association and South African and Ethiopian universities in an integrated watershed management and agroforestry program. The goal is to address food security and land degradation in the Angereb watershed. To date, 2 million seedlings have been planted.

Public invited to attend Fire Summit in Portland March 2

Wildfire scientists, land managers and policy leaders from across the West will convene in Portland on March 1-2 to consider steps to reduce the impacts of catastrophic fire in Western states, and a limited number of seats are available to the public on March 2.

Oregon State University science paper generated global response, financial support

A paper published last December by an Oregon State University scientist became one of the mostly widely shared science papers since 2011, according to the science communications company Altmetric, and has inspired private contributions to support further research. An international team led by William Ripple, distinguished professor in the College of Forestry at Oregon State, published “World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice” in the journal BioScience.

A warmer future for the Pacific Northwest if carbon dioxide levels rise, climate projections show

“From a regional perspective, the differences in projected future changes are minor when you look at how much each projection says climate will change for the business-as-usual scenario,” said Yueyang Jiang, lead author and a postdoctoral scientist at OSU. “The climate projections were created using different downscaling methods, but the projected changes in climate among them are similar at the regional scale.”

CRISPR: The latest word in genetics

“Scientists saw that and thought, What the hell is this?” said Steve Strauss, a forest biotechnology professor at Oregon State University. As it turned out, bacteria that survive a viral invasion use CRISPR to store the viral gene sequences within their own DNA to “remember” and destroy the virus if it returns.

For tropical forest birds, old neighborhoods matter

To reach their conclusions, a team led by Urs Kormann, a post-doctoral scientist in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, surveyed bird communities in 49 forest fragments near the Las Cruces Biological Station in Costa Rica.

Global warming drives global warning

Bill Ripple, a distinguished professor of ecology at Oregon State University, has spent a large part of his career studying the interplay between predators, prey and plant life in and around Yellowstone National Park. But that changed in December, when he took the lead role in authoring a paper titled “World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice,” which was published in the journal BioScience.