College of Forestry News

Yellowstone Wolf

This is the first large-scale study to show that aspen is recovering in areas around the park, as well as inside the park boundary, said Luke Painter, a wildlife ecologist at Oregon State University and lead author on the study. Wolves were reintroduced to the park in 1995.

Poplar plantation

Steve Strauss, a distinguished professor of biotechnology at OSU, joins OPB's Think Out Loud to discuss a recent field study that demonstrated trees can be genetically engineered to prevent new seedlings from establishing.

Brazilian Tree

“If a company receives permits to extract and transport more timber than exists on the property covered by the permits, wood harvested illegally from other areas can be sold as if it came from the permitted property,” said study co-author Mark Schulze, faculty member in OSU’s College of Forestry

Wild Bee

A recent study from Oregon State University suggests that removing timber harvest residue — also known as “slash” — could help wild bee populations thrive in the wake of a clearcut logging operation.

Border Wall

A continuous wall on the border between the United States and Mexico would harm a multitude of animal species by fragmenting their geographic ranges, Oregon State University distinguished professor of ecology William Ripple has concluded, supported by thousands of other scientists around the glob

Poplars

The largest field-based study of genetically modified forest trees ever conducted has demonstrated that genetic engineering can prevent new seedlings from establishing.

Wolf

The relationship between wolves and people raises deep questions that we still need to answer, says environmental ethicist and philosopher Michael Paul Nelson. Nelson is professor of environmental ethics and philosophy at Oregon State University's College of Forestry.

Pollination

“There’s been concern for some time over pollinator declines,” said Jim Rivers, lead scientist and forest ecologist in the College of Forestry. “Some people have gone so far as to call it a pollinator crisis.

Lookout Creek

“This paper is the first to look at the effects of climate change on stream metabolism at the continental scale using field observations,” said Alba Argerich, co-author who monitored McRae Creek and Lookout Creek in the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest east of Eugene, Oregon.