College of Forestry News

Oregon State University and the College of Forestry has created a new endowment based on a major donation from the Institute of Forest Biosciences, formerly the Institute of Forest Biotechnology.

The annual Starker Lecture Series at Oregon State University will this year focus on women who act as agents of change within the forestry and forest products sectors, and also in their communities.

Oregon State Ecampus delivers 31 bachelor’s programs online, including business administration, computer science, fisheries and wildlife sciences, and natural resources.

Field trials in the Northwest and Southwest show that poplar trees can be genetically modified to reduce negative impacts on air quality while leaving their growth potential virtually unchanged, says an Oregon State University researcher who collaborated on the study.

Oregon State University has selected Thomas H. DeLuca, a higher education leader with deep experience in both natural resource and environmental issues, as the next Cheryl Ramberg-Ford and Allyn C. Ford Dean of the OSU College of Forestry.

“Although a number of details and questions remain, we are excited to continue looking at the possibility of transforming the Elliott State Forest into a research forest,” said Anthony S. Davis, interim dean of the OSU College of Forestry.

A study by Oregon State University researchers has identified forests in the western United States that should be preserved for their potential to mitigate climate change through carbon sequestration, as well as to enhance biodiversity.

The study led by professor Matt Betts and postdoctoral scholar Christopher Wolf suggests the closer a forest is to the equator, the more sensitive on average its wildlife species are to fragmentation.

OSU College of Forestry scientists found that deer and elk can play a key role in controlling the broadleaf vegetation, such as alder and maple, that compete with the “crop trees” – the Douglas-fir seedlings – in the replanted clear-cuts deer and elk heavily rely on for forage.

Historically, there were arguments about the authority of federal entities, lack of local community engagement, or disagreement about fire response strategies and tactics.