College of Forestry News

Oregon State University’s College of Forestry is hosting two information sessions for the public regarding OSU’s 10 research forests and the creation of new individual forest management plans to guide the future of those tracts.

Leading scientists, including Bill Ripple, issue a warning: microorganisms will shape our warming world.

The College of Forestry and US Forest Service collaborate at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest in the Cascades. The cover story in the current issue of Terra explores this relationship.

“I’ve seen lots of photos of land charred all around and a house left standing in the middle because the owners created a fire-resistant space next to it. Not always, but often,” says Brad Withrow-Robinson, forester with Oregon State University’s Extension Service.

The Oregon State University College of Forestry is inviting the public to participate in discussions regarding the Elliott State Forest next month in North Bend, Reedsport and Roseburg.

“The world is not a machine,” Nelson said. “If we viewed the world as a system or an organism or something with emergent properties or as a living being, we’d think very differently about proposed solutions or what counted as success.”

Matthew Betts, a professor of landscape ecology in Oregon State University’s College of Forestry, will talk about the movement of hummingbird species across tropical forest landscapes and the pollination of plants within those landscapes Monday, May 13, at Science Pub Corvallis.

“Twenty times more individuals and 11 times more species were captured in areas that experienced high fire severity relative to areas with the lowest fire severity,” said Sara M. Galbraith, a postdoctoral researcher in the College of Forestry.

“A basic rule of ethics is that just because you can do something – in this case, eradicate a harmful species through advanced technologies – doesn’t automatically mean you should do it,” said study co-author Michael Paul Nelson, professor and the Ruth H.

College of Forestry courtesy faculty member Steven Perakis is lead author of a study that finds red alder trees play a key role in healthy forest ecosystems by tapping nutrients from bedrock.