College of Forestry News

Bear and cub

“Gray wolves, brown bears and black bears are managed in most of Alaska in ways designed to significantly lower their numbers,” said study co-author William Ripple, distinguished professor of ecology in the Oregon State University College of Forestry.

Elliot forest

Anthony Davis, interim dean of the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, was interviewed on OPB's Think Out Loud about what the Elliott State Forest could bring to the college as a research forest.

Trail Runners

Oregonians’ participation in outdoor recreation activities saves the state $1.4 billion annually in health care costs, according to a report released Monday by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

GE trees

A coalition of forest scientists including Steve Strauss of Oregon State University is calling for an immediate review of international policies that the group says put unreasonable and harmful limitations on biotech research.

Fire Scars

Tree rings tell the story of what’s happening physiologically as fire suppression makes forests more dense and less tolerant of drought, pests and wildfires, new research shows.

Central Oregon Forest

The results of the study, published in the industry publication Global Change Biology earlier in November, demonstrate that the effects of drought and larger fires driven by climate change will not be spread equally across forests in the Western United States over the next three decades.

PNW Forest

Forests in the Pacific Northwest will be less vulnerable to drought and fire over the next three decades than those in the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada, computer modeling by researchers in Oregon State University’s College of Forestry shows.

Blacktail Deer Creek

The findings, published today in Ecohydrology, are important because they highlight the role big predators play in the health of aquatic and riparian ecosystems.

seedling

In a paper published November 1 in Science, Michael Paul Nelson and collaborators propose a coordinating body to act as a neutral third party in gene-editing decision-making.

Wild Bee

An international collaboration, led by Jim Rivers of Oregon State University, has established a roadmap for future research aimed at better understanding the role that managed conifer forests in temperate zones play for the conservation of pollinators such as bees, wasps, flies, beetles and butte