College of Forestry News

Field trials in the Northwest and Southwest show that poplar trees can be genetically modified to reduce negative impacts on air quality while leaving their growth potential virtually unchanged, says an Oregon State University researcher who collaborated on the study.

Oregon State University has selected Thomas H. DeLuca, a higher education leader with deep experience in both natural resource and environmental issues, as the next Cheryl Ramberg-Ford and Allyn C. Ford Dean of the OSU College of Forestry.

“Although a number of details and questions remain, we are excited to continue looking at the possibility of transforming the Elliott State Forest into a research forest,” said Anthony S. Davis, interim dean of the OSU College of Forestry.

A study by Oregon State University researchers has identified forests in the western United States that should be preserved for their potential to mitigate climate change through carbon sequestration, as well as to enhance biodiversity.

The study led by professor Matt Betts and postdoctoral scholar Christopher Wolf suggests the closer a forest is to the equator, the more sensitive on average its wildlife species are to fragmentation.

OSU College of Forestry scientists found that deer and elk can play a key role in controlling the broadleaf vegetation, such as alder and maple, that compete with the “crop trees” – the Douglas-fir seedlings – in the replanted clear-cuts deer and elk heavily rely on for forage.

Chal Landgren, a professor in OSU’s College of Forestry at the North Willamette Research and Extension Center in Aurora, said the supply can be attributed to two main factors.

Historically, there were arguments about the authority of federal entities, lack of local community engagement, or disagreement about fire response strategies and tactics.

Conventional timber harvesting has no effect on carbon levels in the mineral soils of the western Pacific Northwest for at least 3 1/2 years after harvest, according to recently-published research by Oregon State University and Weyerhaeuser Company.

A global coalition of scientists led by William J. Ripple and Christopher Wolf of Oregon State University says “untold human suffering” is unavoidable without deep and lasting shifts in human activities that contribute to greenhouse gas emissions and other factors related to climate change.