OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY
Crater Lake

Welcome to the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society

Cascade Head

Welcome to the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society

Welcome to the Department of Forest Ecosystems & Society

Snowcat at HJA

Welcome to the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society

Sun in the redwoods

Welcome to the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society

Students in Central Oregon

Welcome to the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society

Welcome to the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society

Sol Duc

Welcome to the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society

Welcome to the Department of Forest Ecosystems & Society

Squirrel monkeys

Welcome to the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society

Students and fire

Welcome to the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society

Welcome to the Department of Forest Ecosystems & Society

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Our Mission!

Our department brings together biological and social scientists and philosophers to understand ecological systems, social systems, and the interactions between them. We work in terrestrial to aquatic systems, in wildland to urban settings, and from local to global scales. We evaluate the scientific and philosophical basis for management and policy decisions and provide enhanced frameworks for those decisions reflective of our latest findings. We conduct creative problem-solving and fundamental research; educate and engage the next generation of scholars, practitioners and users of the world’s natural resources; and share our knowledge and discoveries with others.

FES Development Plan - Phase 1 (2013)

Welcome to Dr. Troy Hall

FES News

Runaround: Three Months of Correspondence With the EPA

When the EPA dismisses members of the media, it is dismissing the public—the people the agency is supposed to serve, said Michael Nelson, a professor of environmental ethics at Oregon State University.

What Do Wild Animals Do in a Wildfire?

Heat can kill too—even organisms buried deep in the ground, such as fungi. Jane Smith, a mycologist with the U.S. Forest Service in Corvallis, Oregon, has measured temperatures as high as 1,292 degrees Fahrenheit (700 degrees Celsius) beneath logs burning in a wildfire, and 212 degrees Fahrenheit (100 degrees Celsius) a full two inches (five centimeters) below the surface.

Precipitation and Not Warming Temperatures May be More to Blame for Bird Population Shifts

Warming temperatures may not impact birds as much as you might think. Instead, precipitation is what might cause problems for species in North America. "When we think of climate change, we automatically think warmer temperatures," said Matthew Betts, professor in the College of Forestry. "But our analysis found that for many species, it is precipitation that most affects the long-term survival of many bird species."

Event Calendar


31Jul2014

Oak Woodlands and Private Landowners:

Oak Woodlands and oak savanna, once widely distributed across the Willamette Valley, are now the focus of important restoration and conservation efforts.  Private landowners as well as several…
14Aug2014

Twilight Tour

Are you interested in adding native plant diversity on your property?  This event will interest you.  Paul Wilson and Linda Farris have been actively restoring a range of…