OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

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Our Mission!

Our department brings together biological and social scientists and philosophers to understand ecological systems, social systems, and the interactions between them. We work in terrestrial to aquatic systems, in wildland to urban settings, and from local to global scales. We evaluate the scientific and philosophical basis for management and policy decisions and provide enhanced frameworks for those decisions reflective of our latest findings. We conduct creative problem-solving and fundamental research; educate and engage the next generation of scholars, practitioners and users of the world’s natural resources; and share our knowledge and discoveries with others.

FES News

Collateral damage: Backers say M2-89 would only ban GMO crops, but OSU researchers fear it would hurt them too

In his third-floor laboratory in Richardson Hall, Oregon State University forestry professor Steven Strauss shows off his latest creation: genetically engineered poplar trees that can be propagated in a Petri dish but are incapable of reproducing in the field.

When Have Wolves Made A 'Recovery?' It Depends On Your Definition.

FES professor and ecologist Bill Ripple is famous for his work looking at the ecological effect of the reintroduction of wolves in Yellowstone, finding that the apex predators have a profound impact on the whole landscape, including vegetation. For example, the threat of wolves influence where deer and elk feed, allowing certain plant communities to thrive. “I think it’s important to think about ecological interactions and the functions that predators have, rather than just the total number that may be in a state, or on a landscape or in a region,” Ripple says.

Global decline of large herbivores may lead to an “empty landscape,” scientists say

Study leader Professor William Ripple, of the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, said: ‘I expected that habitat change would be the main factor causing the endangerment of large herbivores. But surprisingly, the results show that the two main factors in herbivore declines are hunting by humans and habitat change. They are twin threats.'

Event Calendar


30May2015

National Get Outdoors Day

The third annual National Get Outdoors Day event will be held on Saturday May 30th, 2015 from 10:00am-3:00pm at Peavy Arboretum.  This free event is hosted by OSU…